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image: Detecting Lyme Early

Detecting Lyme Early

By | February 12, 2016

Two new methods could help researchers to diagnose Lyme disease earlier than with existing tests.

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image: Neanderthals’ Genetic Legacy

Neanderthals’ Genetic Legacy

By | February 11, 2016

Ancient DNA in the genomes of modern humans influences a range of physiological traits.

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image: Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

By | February 5, 2016

A study on human cells reveals how cellular aging affects the 3-D architecture of chromosomes.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Giraffe Diplomacy

Giraffe Diplomacy

By | February 1, 2016

Is the public dissection of zoo animals a boon to research and education, a PR nightmare, or both?

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image: Giraffe in Half

Giraffe in Half

By | February 1, 2016

Watch footage from the public dissection of Marius, the young giraffe at the Copenhagen Zoo who was ultimately fed to predators at the facility. (CAUTION: GRAPHIC IMAGES)

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image: Marriages of Opportunity

Marriages of Opportunity

By | February 1, 2016

New ideas for antibody-drug conjugate design

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

10 Comments

image: Schizophrenia and the Synapse

Schizophrenia and the Synapse

By | January 27, 2016

Genetic evidence suggests that overactive synaptic pruning drives development of schizophrenia.

5 Comments

image: Lizard Secretes Heat

Lizard Secretes Heat

By | January 25, 2016

Researchers confirm the unprecedented endothermic abilities of a South American reptile.

1 Comment

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