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image: You Are <em>When</em> You Eat

You Are When You Eat

By | September 1, 2013

Circadian time zones and metabolism

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image: Mind the Clock

Mind the Clock

By | September 1, 2013

Many of the body's tissues can tell time, and these peripheral clocks can be influenced by environmental cues, such as the timing of food consumption.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

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image: Monkeys Accept Virtual Arms as Own

Monkeys Accept Virtual Arms as Own

By | August 26, 2013

In a variation of the classic rubber-hand experiment, researchers have shown how the macaque brain can confuse visual and tactile stimuli.

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image: Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

By | August 15, 2013

Continuously eating fatty foods perturbs communication between the gut and brain, which in turn perpetuates a bad diet.

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image: Cancer-Causing Herbal Remedies

Cancer-Causing Herbal Remedies

By | August 7, 2013

A potent carcinogen lurks within certain traditional Chinese medicines.

15 Comments

image: STW: In the Field

STW: In the Field

By | August 1, 2013

Scientist to Watch Josh Snodgrass has traveled the world, from Siberia to South America, to study how the physiology of indigenous peoples shifts with changing lifestyles.

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image: Josh Snodgrass: An Adaptive Mind

Josh Snodgrass: An Adaptive Mind

By | August 1, 2013

Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon. Age: 41

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image: Sketching out Cell Theory, circa 1837

Sketching out Cell Theory, circa 1837

By | August 1, 2013

How a dinner-table conversation between two biologists led to the formulation of the theory that cells are the building blocks of all living organisms.

3 Comments

image: The Eye of the Finch

The Eye of the Finch

By | August 1, 2013

Beaks did it for Darwin. Now, monitoring real-time evolution of bacteria that infects finch eyes reveals repeated, rapid evolution of an emerging avian pathogen in backyards throughout the U.S.

3 Comments

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