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image: Putting the Men in Menopause

Putting the Men in Menopause

By | September 1, 2013

Can mating behavior explain the evolution of menopause in humans?

10 Comments

image: Remaking a Classic

Remaking a Classic

By | September 1, 2013

Companies are bursting at the seams with tools to engineer pharma’s next magic bullet: the new and improved antibody.

0 Comments

image: Why Women Lose Fertility

Why Women Lose Fertility

By | September 1, 2013

Mating behavior is an unlikely driver of women's reproductive aging.

5 Comments

image: You Are <em>When</em> You Eat

You Are When You Eat

By | September 1, 2013

Circadian time zones and metabolism

0 Comments

image: Mind the Clock

Mind the Clock

By | September 1, 2013

Many of the body's tissues can tell time, and these peripheral clocks can be influenced by environmental cues, such as the timing of food consumption.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

6 Comments

image: Monkeys Accept Virtual Arms as Own

Monkeys Accept Virtual Arms as Own

By | August 26, 2013

In a variation of the classic rubber-hand experiment, researchers have shown how the macaque brain can confuse visual and tactile stimuli.

0 Comments

image: Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

By | August 15, 2013

Continuously eating fatty foods perturbs communication between the gut and brain, which in turn perpetuates a bad diet.

8 Comments

image: Cancer-Causing Herbal Remedies

Cancer-Causing Herbal Remedies

By | August 7, 2013

A potent carcinogen lurks within certain traditional Chinese medicines.

15 Comments

image: STW: In the Field

STW: In the Field

By | August 1, 2013

Scientist to Watch Josh Snodgrass has traveled the world, from Siberia to South America, to study how the physiology of indigenous peoples shifts with changing lifestyles.

0 Comments

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