The Scientist

» physiology and ecology

Most Recent

image: Dustup Over Lionfish Science Fair Project

Dustup Over Lionfish Science Fair Project

By | July 23, 2014

A former graduate student says he feels slighted by a failure to attribute his contributions to a line of research regarding the salinity tolerances of an invasive species.

15 Comments

image: Grade-schooler Schools Ecologists

Grade-schooler Schools Ecologists

By | July 23, 2014

A sixth grader’s science project on the salinity tolerance of lionfish inspires an academic researcher to confirm the student’s results, expanding knowledge of an invasive species.

4 Comments

image: Insecticides Harm Birds Indirectly

Insecticides Harm Birds Indirectly

By | July 10, 2014

The effects of neonicotinoid use on insect populations appear to be rippling through the food chain, scientists show.

1 Comment

image: Human Skin Can “Smell” Odors

Human Skin Can “Smell” Odors

By | July 10, 2014

Olfactory receptors in the skin may help repair damaged tissue, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: The Mantis Shrimp’s UV View

The Mantis Shrimp’s UV View

By | July 7, 2014

A crustacean’s eyes are tuned to ultraviolet frequencies with the help of a biological sunblock molecule.

0 Comments

image: Lichen Legion

Lichen Legion

By | July 2, 2014

Genetic analysis splits one species into 126.

0 Comments

image: Sari van Anders: Sexy Thoughts, Sexy Data

Sari van Anders: Sexy Thoughts, Sexy Data

By | July 1, 2014

Assistant professor, Psychology and Women’s Studies, University of Michigan. Age: 36

1 Comment

image: Emperor Penguins on Thin Ice

Emperor Penguins on Thin Ice

By | June 30, 2014

A new model suggests emperor penguin populations could decline by 19 percent by 2100.

0 Comments

image: Mosquitoes Attracted to Malaria-Infected Mice

Mosquitoes Attracted to Malaria-Infected Mice

By | June 30, 2014

Mice infected with a malaria-causing parasite emit odors that are more attractive to malaria-transmitting mosquitoes than uninfected animals, a study shows.

2 Comments

image: Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

By | June 18, 2014

Microroboticists have designed simple sensors based on insect light organs called ocelli to stabilize a miniature flying robot.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Neurons Compete to Form Memories
  2. Mapping the Human Connectome
    Daily News Mapping the Human Connectome

    A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

  3. The Genetic Components of Rare Diseases
  4. Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised
RayBiotech