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image: Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

By | June 1, 2017

Lab studies suggest that plastic pollutants in the environment could have detrimental effects on animals’ physiology.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Pervade Water and Land

Plastic Pollutants Pervade Water and Land

By | June 1, 2017

Contamination of marine and terrestrial ecosystems by microplastics is putting individual organisms at risk.

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image: No Place to Hide

No Place to Hide

By | May 31, 2017

Environmental DNA is tracking down difficult-to-detect species, from rock snot in the U.S. to cave salamanders in Croatia.

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image: Grad Student Acquitted in Thesis-Sharing Case

Grad Student Acquitted in Thesis-Sharing Case

By | May 25, 2017

Diego Gomez was facing jail time in Colombia for posting someone else’s copyrighted thesis online.

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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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image: More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

By | May 3, 2017

Scientists report that thiamethoxam exposure impairs bumblebees’ reproduction and honey bees’ ability to fly.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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image: Tissue-Clearing Technique Works on Bone

Tissue-Clearing Technique Works on Bone

By | April 26, 2017

CLARITY made mouse bones transparent while preserving fluorescent labels so researchers could visualize tagged osteoprogenitors.

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image: Sweet Trick, Hawkmoths

Sweet Trick, Hawkmoths

By | April 17, 2017

The fast-flying insects convert sugars from nectar into antioxidants, which can help heal the oxidative damage suffered by their hard-working muscles.

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