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image: Owl Be Darned

Owl Be Darned

By | December 4, 2015

Researchers studying city-dwelling birds are learning about which animals are more suited to urban life.

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image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.

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image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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image: Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity

Wiping Out Gut Bugs Stops Obesity

By | November 16, 2015

In mice lacking intestinal microbiota, white fat turns brown and obesity is prevented.

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image: Fish Size, Vision Skills Explained

Fish Size, Vision Skills Explained

By | November 5, 2015

Scientists describe molecular underpinnings of salmon size and of fishes’ ability to navigate murky environments in separate studies.

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image: Fat Saps Muscle

Fat Saps Muscle

By | November 1, 2015

The accumulation of fat within skeletal muscle, as happens with obesity, diminishes muscle performance.

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image: New Data Attempt to Resolve Protein Dispute

New Data Attempt to Resolve Protein Dispute

By | October 22, 2015

The latest analysis on GDF11, a proposed antiaging protein, blames discrepancies in the literature on misreported doses and misinterpretation.

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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