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image: School Teachers Release Invasives

School Teachers Release Invasives

By | August 9, 2012

As many as 1,000 different non-native organisms used in the classroom are being released into the wild by school teachers.

7 Comments

image: How Green Are Your Fish?

How Green Are Your Fish?

By | August 1, 2012

Farmed salmon may have more in common with their more expensive wild-caught counterparts than consumers are led to believe.

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Contributors

August 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Life (Re)Cycle

Life (Re)Cycle

By | August 1, 2012

Death breeds life in the world’s most diverse and abundant group of animals.

4 Comments

image: A Scientist Emerges

A Scientist Emerges

By | August 1, 2012

At age 16, Alexandra Sourakov has her first scientific publication, on the foraging behavior of butterflies.

3 Comments

image: Replacement Parts

Replacement Parts

By | August 1, 2012

To cope with a growing shortage of hearts, livers, and lungs suitable for transplant, some scientists are genetically engineering pigs, while others are growing organs in the lab.

16 Comments

image: The Mechanical Body

The Mechanical Body

By | July 26, 2012

“The body is a fascinating machine,” says Sandra Shefelbine, a biomechanics expert at Imperial College, London, in this 3-minute educational video by the Wellcome Trust illustrating the principles of muscle movement. “And we don’t understand most of

2 Comments

image: An Olympic Book Review

An Olympic Book Review

By | July 26, 2012

The Science of Sports: Winning in the Olympics takes a timely look at research on athletics.

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image: Wired to Run—and Think

Wired to Run—and Think

By | July 26, 2012

Evolving the ability to run may also have made our ancestors smarter, suggesting that exercise can be healthy for the brain as well as the body.

2 Comments

image: Double Duplication

Double Duplication

By | July 24, 2012

Two whole genome duplications boosted the complexity of the ancestor of all vertebrates, but also introduced potential for disease.

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