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image: A Prosthetic Advantage?

A Prosthetic Advantage?

By | September 1, 2017

Scientists are analyzing how factors such as the length and stiffness of artificial limbs affect performance in athletes with amputations.

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image: Heart’s Backup Pacemaker Mechanisms Identified

Heart’s Backup Pacemaker Mechanisms Identified

By | July 28, 2017

The sinoatrial node is home to multiple pacemakers that keep the heart beating if the main one falters.

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image: Anti-Preeclampsia Hormone Discovered

Anti-Preeclampsia Hormone Discovered

By | June 29, 2017

A small, placenta-produced peptide fixes the pregnancy-related condition in mice. 

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image: Bone Marrow Isn’t the Only Source of Platelets

Bone Marrow Isn’t the Only Source of Platelets

By | June 1, 2017

Scientists have estimated that about half of murine platelet production occurs in the lungs.

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image: Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

By | June 1, 2017

Parallel evolution in jaws and teeth helped early mammals diversify their diets.

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image: Running on Empty

Running on Empty

By | June 1, 2017

Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

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image: Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

By | June 1, 2017

Lab studies suggest that plastic pollutants in the environment could have detrimental effects on animals’ physiology.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Pervade Water and Land

Plastic Pollutants Pervade Water and Land

By | June 1, 2017

Contamination of marine and terrestrial ecosystems by microplastics is putting individual organisms at risk.

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image: Tissue-Clearing Technique Works on Bone

Tissue-Clearing Technique Works on Bone

By | April 26, 2017

CLARITY made mouse bones transparent while preserving fluorescent labels so researchers could visualize tagged osteoprogenitors.

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image: Sweet Trick, Hawkmoths

Sweet Trick, Hawkmoths

By | April 17, 2017

The fast-flying insects convert sugars from nectar into antioxidants, which can help heal the oxidative damage suffered by their hard-working muscles.

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