The Scientist

» physiology

Most Recent

image: Week in Review: June 29–July 3

Week in Review: June 29–July 3

By | July 3, 2015

Sex differences in processing pain; clue in flu vaccine–narcolepsy link found; early antibiotic use affects the gut microbiome; lizard sex determined by genes, then temperature

0 Comments

image: High-Flying Ducks

High-Flying Ducks

By | July 1, 2015

Five species of waterfowl have evolved a variety of adaptations to adjust to the high altitude of South America’s Lake Titicaca.

1 Comment

image: Warm-Blooded Fish

Warm-Blooded Fish

By | May 15, 2015

The opah, or moonfish, is a deep-sea fish that regulates its body temperature more like a mammal than any of its finned kin, researchers have determined.

2 Comments

image: The Dark Side of Light

The Dark Side of Light

By | May 14, 2015

Artificially extended days cause mice to gain fat and alter the function of their brown fat, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: Gut Microbes Influence Circadian Clock

Gut Microbes Influence Circadian Clock

By | April 16, 2015

Metabolites produced by gut microbes in mice can affect the animals’ circadian rhythm and metabolism. 

2 Comments

image: Drug Stimulates Brown Fat

Drug Stimulates Brown Fat

By | January 28, 2015

A small study finds that an approved medication increases metabolic rate and the activity of thermogenic brown fat in men.

2 Comments

image: Growing Human Guts in Mice

Growing Human Guts in Mice

By | January 12, 2015

Researchers make more progress toward growing human intestines in mice, paving the way for better models of intestinal function and failure.

0 Comments

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

image: Straighten Out

Straighten Out

By | January 1, 2015

Forces from bidirectional growth plates mechanically realign broken bones in infant mice.

0 Comments

image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

6 Comments

Popular Now

  1. A Coral to Outlast Climate Change
  2. Antarctica Is Turning Green
  3. First In Vivo Human Genome Editing to Be Tested in New Clinical Trial
  4. Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?
AAAS