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image: A Lab on Everest

A Lab on Everest

By | April 23, 2012

Mayo Clinic researchers set up shop in the Himalayas to study the physiology of climbers attempting to scale the world's highest peak.

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image: Child-Proofing Drugs

Child-Proofing Drugs

By | March 1, 2012

When children need medications, getting the dosing and method of administration right is like trying to hit a moving target with an untried weapon.

6 Comments

image: Calcium and the Pancreas

Calcium and the Pancreas

By | February 1, 2012

Normal pancreatic function depends on the precise flow of calcium within and into the acinar cells of the organ. 

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image: The War Within

The War Within

By | February 1, 2012

Unraveling the molecular causes of acute pancreatitis—a potentially deadly disease in which the pancreas essentially digests itself—is yielding clues to how it might be treated.

12 Comments

image: Ultrasound Halts Sperm Production

Ultrasound Halts Sperm Production

By | January 30, 2012

Zapping testicles with ultrasound appears to reduce sperm counts to low levels in rats.

3 Comments

image: Caffeine Affects Estrogen Levels

Caffeine Affects Estrogen Levels

By | January 26, 2012

Moderate caffeine intake is associated with higher estrogen levels for Asians, but lower levels for whites.

6 Comments

image: Resolving Chronic Pain

Resolving Chronic Pain

By | January 1, 2012

The body’s own mechanism for dispersing the inflammatory reaction might lead to new treatments for chronic pain.

76 Comments

image: The Comfort Food Drug

The Comfort Food Drug

By | December 9, 2011

Researchers found that stress eating can blunt the body’s stress response.

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image: University Settles With Professor

University Settles With Professor

By | November 29, 2011

The University of Oklahoma settles a case against a professor accused of harming students in his research.

3 Comments

image: The Roots of Violence

The Roots of Violence

By | November 23, 2011

Scientists discover the earliest evidence of human-on-human aggression etched in an ancient skull.

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