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image: Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

By | June 18, 2014

Microroboticists have designed simple sensors based on insect light organs called ocelli to stabilize a miniature flying robot.

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image: Fruit Fly Flight Tactics

Fruit Fly Flight Tactics

By | April 14, 2014

High-speed cameras capture the remarkable in-flight maneuvers fruit flies use to avoid predators.

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image: Shivering Akin to Exercising

Shivering Akin to Exercising

By | February 4, 2014

Working out and shivering in the cold both upregulate hormones and genes involved in brown fat production.

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image: A Ribbeting Tale

A Ribbeting Tale

By | January 1, 2014

A famous frog-hopping contest yields data that challenge previous lab estimates of how far a bullfrog can jump.

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image: Avoiding Salt

Avoiding Salt

By | January 1, 2014

In a newly identified tropism, plant roots steer clear of salinity.

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image: Male Mosquitoes Trigger Egg Production

Male Mosquitoes Trigger Egg Production

By | October 29, 2013

Malaria-transmitting female Anopheles gambiae develop eggs upon mating as a result of a steroid hormone injected into them by males.

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image: Citations Predict Nobel Winners?

Citations Predict Nobel Winners?

By | September 25, 2013

Thomson Reuters makes its annual data-based picks for which scientists could collect medals in Stockholm later this year.

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image: Flexible Cells

Flexible Cells

By | September 1, 2013

When stretched, lung cells signal to each other by releasing ATP.

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image: Out of Sync

Out of Sync

By | September 1, 2013

Why eating at the wrong times is tied to such profound and negative effects on our bodies

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image: Putting the Men in Menopause

Putting the Men in Menopause

By | September 1, 2013

Can mating behavior explain the evolution of menopause in humans?

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