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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: Image of the Day: Glowing Gut

Image of the Day: Glowing Gut

By | February 8, 2013

A maturing mouse gut nervous system (shown in orange), a mesh-like system of neurons that regulates digestion and gastrointenstial function, runs from the stomach through the intestines.

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image: The Reason for Wrinkled Fingers

The Reason for Wrinkled Fingers

By | January 10, 2013

Wrinkled skin on our fingers after long soaks in water may have made human ancestors more dexterous with aquatic tasks.

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image: The Sodium Cycle

The Sodium Cycle

By | January 8, 2013

Researchers uncover weekly and monthly rhythms of sodium retention and excretion in participants of space simulations.

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image: In the Long Run

In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

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image: Long and Rocky Roads

Long and Rocky Roads

By | November 1, 2012

From basic research to beneficial therapies

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Hour Between Dog and Wolf</em>

Book Excerpt from The Hour Between Dog and Wolf

By | September 5, 2012

In his latest book, author John Coates describes the tension and exultation of the trading floor from a biological perspective.

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image: Replacement Parts

Replacement Parts

By | August 1, 2012

To cope with a growing shortage of hearts, livers, and lungs suitable for transplant, some scientists are genetically engineering pigs, while others are growing organs in the lab.

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image: The Mechanical Body

The Mechanical Body

By | July 26, 2012

“The body is a fascinating machine,” says Sandra Shefelbine, a biomechanics expert at Imperial College, London, in this 3-minute educational video by the Wellcome Trust illustrating the principles of muscle movement. “And we don’t understand most of

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