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image: An Olympic Book Review

An Olympic Book Review

By | July 26, 2012

The Science of Sports: Winning in the Olympics takes a timely look at research on athletics.

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image: Surgical Art

Surgical Art

By | June 1, 2012

InĀ 1929 and 1930, Johns Hopkins Medical School surgeon Warfield Firor carried out a series of experiments to determine how long blood could flow between animals with joined circulatory systems. Without using any anti-coagulants, Firor attempted to es

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image: Digging the Underground Life

Digging the Underground Life

By | June 1, 2012

A rare peek inside the subterranean home of the naked mole-rat

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image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

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image: Space Rocks

Space Rocks

By | June 1, 2012

Orbiting ultrasound machines are being used to diagnose and treat astronauts' kidney stones.

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The Blood Exchange, Circa 1930

By | June 1, 2012

Early 20th century cross circulation experiments on dogs paved the way for milestones in human cardiac surgery.

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image: Underground Supermodels

Underground Supermodels

By | June 1, 2012

What can a twentysomething naked mole-rat tell us about fighting pain, cancer, and aging?

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image: A Lab on Everest

A Lab on Everest

By | April 23, 2012

Mayo Clinic researchers set up shop in the Himalayas to study the physiology of climbers attempting to scale the world's highest peak.

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image: Child-Proofing Drugs

Child-Proofing Drugs

By | March 1, 2012

When children need medications, getting the dosing and method of administration right is like trying to hit a moving target with an untried weapon.

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image: Calcium and the Pancreas

Calcium and the Pancreas

By | February 1, 2012

Normal pancreatic function depends on the precise flow of calcium within and into the acinar cells of the organ. 

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