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» DNA methylation and microbiology

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image: Characterizing the Imprintome

Characterizing the Imprintome

By | January 1, 2017

Three techniques for identifying the collection of maternal and paternal genes silenced in offspring

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image: Methylation Maestro

Methylation Maestro

By | January 1, 2017

After initially discovering that DNA methylation represses transcription, Howard Cedar continues to explore how the epigenetic mark regulates gene expression.

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image: Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

By | January 1, 2017

Plants grown in dry soil produce offspring that are hardier in drought conditions, and DNA methylation appears responsible. 

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image: More Anti-CRISPR Proteins to Block Cas9

More Anti-CRISPR Proteins to Block Cas9

By | December 29, 2016

The latest CRISPR deactivators to be discovered turn off the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 widely used in genome editing.

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image: New CRISPR-Cas Enzymes Discovered

New CRISPR-Cas Enzymes Discovered

By | December 22, 2016

A metagenomics analysis finds Cas9 in archaea for the first time, along with two previously unknown Cas nucleases from bacteria.

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Scientists present evidence of bacteria-driven mating in flagellate eukaryotes at the American Society for Cell Biology annual meeting.

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image: Phages Carry Antibiotic Resistance Genes

Phages Carry Antibiotic Resistance Genes

By | December 8, 2016

Researchers find evidence of antibiotic resistance genes in the DNA of viruses that infect bacteria.

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image: Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease

Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease

By | December 1, 2016

Bacteria in the intestine influence motor dysfunction and neuroinflammation in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease.

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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A new literature review finds that even if babies born via Cesarean section have long-term health risks, as a number of past studies purport, it may not be a result of the procedure itself.

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