The Scientist

» DNA methylation and culture

Most Recent

image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

1 Comment

image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

1 Comment

image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

0 Comments

An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

0 Comments

image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

5 Comments

image: Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

By | February 1, 2017

Unlike animals, plants stably pass on their DNA methylomes from one generation to the next. The resulting gene silencing likely hides an abundance of phenotypic variation.

2 Comments

image: Infographic: Plant Methylation Basics

Infographic: Plant Methylation Basics

By | February 1, 2017

Multiple molecular mechanisms keep plant DNA methylation in order.

0 Comments

image: Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

By | January 11, 2017

Researchers attempt to estimate how much of the human genome’s methylation patterns can be attributed to genetic ancestry.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Testosterone Rex</em>

Book Excerpt from Testosterone Rex

By | January 1, 2017

In Chapter 6, “The Hormonal Essence of the T-Rex?” author Cordelia Fine considers the biological dogma that testes, and the powerful hormones they exude, are the root of all sexual inequality.

0 Comments

image: Characterizing the Imprintome

Characterizing the Imprintome

By | January 1, 2017

Three techniques for identifying the collection of maternal and paternal genes silenced in offspring

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS