The Scientist

» DNA methylation and culture

Most Recent

image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

5 Comments

image: Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

Plants’ Epigenetic Secrets

By | February 1, 2017

Unlike animals, plants stably pass on their DNA methylomes from one generation to the next. The resulting gene silencing likely hides an abundance of phenotypic variation.

2 Comments

image: Infographic: Plant Methylation Basics

Infographic: Plant Methylation Basics

By | February 1, 2017

Multiple molecular mechanisms keep plant DNA methylation in order.

0 Comments

image: Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

By | January 11, 2017

Researchers attempt to estimate how much of the human genome’s methylation patterns can be attributed to genetic ancestry.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Testosterone Rex</em>

Book Excerpt from Testosterone Rex

By | January 1, 2017

In Chapter 6, “The Hormonal Essence of the T-Rex?” author Cordelia Fine considers the biological dogma that testes, and the powerful hormones they exude, are the root of all sexual inequality.

0 Comments

image: Characterizing the Imprintome

Characterizing the Imprintome

By | January 1, 2017

Three techniques for identifying the collection of maternal and paternal genes silenced in offspring

3 Comments

image: Methylation Maestro

Methylation Maestro

By | January 1, 2017

After initially discovering that DNA methylation represses transcription, Howard Cedar continues to explore how the epigenetic mark regulates gene expression.

3 Comments

image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | January 1, 2017

Science under Trump, gene drive, medical marijuana, and more

0 Comments

image: Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

By | January 1, 2017

Plants grown in dry soil produce offspring that are hardier in drought conditions, and DNA methylation appears responsible. 

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science: 2016

Speaking of Science: 2016

By | December 19, 2016

Selected quotes from an eventful year

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Optimism for Key Deer After Hurricane Irma
  2. Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?
  3. Decoding the Tripping Brain
  4. Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes
    The Nutshell Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes

    Analysis of the bodies of deceased individuals can’t determine what effect these tattoo remnants have on lymph function, but researchers suggest dirty needles aren’t the only risk of the age-old practice.

AAAS