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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Jeremy Day Probes Reward Signaling in the Brain

Jeremy Day Probes Reward Signaling in the Brain

By | January 1, 2017

The University of Alabama, Birmingham, researcher seeks the neural roots of animal behavior

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image: Methylation Maestro

Methylation Maestro

By | January 1, 2017

After initially discovering that DNA methylation represses transcription, Howard Cedar continues to explore how the epigenetic mark regulates gene expression.

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image: Pharma Redo

Pharma Redo

By | January 1, 2017

Steve Braun of Cures Within Reach, a nonprofit focused on breathing new life into old medicines, describes the potential benefits of drug repurposing.

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image: Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

By | January 1, 2017

Plants grown in dry soil produce offspring that are hardier in drought conditions, and DNA methylation appears responsible. 

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Oncologists have raised concerns about a mouse study that suggests the vaccine for human papillomavirus could cause brain damage.

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image: Opinion: A Tale of Two Hemispheres

Opinion: A Tale of Two Hemispheres

By | December 20, 2016

Studying savant-like behaviors in birds could help researchers better understand autism spectrum disorders.

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image: Pregnancy May Remodel the Brain’s Social Cognition Regions

Pregnancy May Remodel the Brain’s Social Cognition Regions

By | December 20, 2016

Reductions in the volume of gray matter in specific regions appear to represent synaptic pruning, a new study suggests, that tunes a mother’s brain to childcare.

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image: Retrieving Short-Term Memories

Retrieving Short-Term Memories

By | December 1, 2016

Neurons can continue to capture a short-term memory without continuous firing, researchers show.  

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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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