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image: Funding Turnaround?

Funding Turnaround?

By | January 12, 2015

The National Institutes of Health saw a slight improvement in success rate for R01 or equivalent grants last year.


image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: Focus on Sex

Focus on Sex

By | December 29, 2014

In 2014, new research findings and guidelines brought increased attention to biological differences between males and females.


image: Science Setbacks: 2014

Science Setbacks: 2014

By | December 25, 2014

This year in life science was marked by paltry federal funding increases, revelations of sequence contamination, and onerous regulations.


image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.


image: 2015 Science Funding Flat

2015 Science Funding Flat

By | December 15, 2014

The US legislature passed a spending agreement for next year, and the deal has only modest increases for federal science agencies.


image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.


image: A Race Against Extinction

A Race Against Extinction

By | December 1, 2014

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.


image: Opinion: On “Funding Research in Africa”

Opinion: On “Funding Research in Africa”

By | November 28, 2014

A letter to The Scientist from NIH Director Francis Collins and Wellcome Trust Director Jeremy Farrar


image: Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

Virus May Explain “Melting” Sea Stars

By | November 19, 2014

Researchers discover a densovirus that is strongly associated with sea star wasting disease.


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