The Scientist

» neuroimaging and developmental biology

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image: Fly on a String

Fly on a String

By | February 1, 2014

Fruit flies are fixed to a silica fiber in this new technique to aid neuroscientists in performing laser surgery prior to neuroimaging.

3 Comments

image: Meiosis Maven

Meiosis Maven

By | February 1, 2014

Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.

1 Comment

image: Unmasking Secret Identities

Unmasking Secret Identities

By | February 1, 2014

A tour of techniques for measuring DNA hydroxymethylation

2 Comments

image: Single Neuron-Imaging Bot

Single Neuron-Imaging Bot

By | February 1, 2014

New technology probes the functional unit of nervous transmission.

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image: Brains in Action

Brains in Action

By | February 1, 2014

Neuroscientists are automating neural imaging and recording, allowing them to monitor increasingly large swaths of the brain in living, behaving animals.  

2 Comments

image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: Lights, Camera, Action

Lights, Camera, Action

By | January 1, 2014

A guide for doing in vivo microscopy on neurons in the mammalian brain

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image: Week in Review: December 2–6

Week in Review: December 2–6

By | December 6, 2013

Oldest hominin DNA sequence; visualizing dyslexia; testing CRISPR; cancer and autoimmunity

0 Comments

image: Deconstructing Dyslexia

Deconstructing Dyslexia

By | December 5, 2013

Adults with dyslexia may have trouble reading because of a dysfunctional connection between language-processing areas of their brains.

3 Comments

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