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Obesity-associated microbiome composition can persist after weight loss, affecting the exchange of metabolites between a mouse and its resident bugs, researchers report.

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image: Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

By | November 18, 2016

E. coli cultured on the International Space Station show increased expression of genes related to starvation and acid-resistance responses, researchers report.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

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image: The Human Virome

The Human Virome

By | November 1, 2016

Diverse viruses can be found commingling with human and bacteria cells in and on people’s bodies. Scientists are just beginning to understand how these viruses help and when they can turn pathogenic.

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image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

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image: Birders Break North American Record

Birders Break North American Record

By | October 1, 2016

A nude birder and an Australian zoo owner are competing to set the new bar for the number of species spotted in a single year.

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image: Extreme Birding

Extreme Birding

By | October 1, 2016

Oregonian Noah Strycker broke the world Big Year birding record when he saw his 4,342nd species of the calendar year in 2015.

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image: Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

By | October 1, 2016

Bacteria inhabit most tissues in the human body, and genes from some of these microbes have made their way to the human genome. Could this genetic transfer contribute to diseases such as cancer?

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