The Scientist

» digital PCR, neuroscience and disease/medicine

Most Recent

image: Flickering Neurons

Flickering Neurons

By | February 1, 2013

Fluorescent calcium sensors in transgenic mice give a real-time readout of neuronal activity.

1 Comment

image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.


image: Catching the Cold

Catching the Cold

By | February 1, 2013

Tracking the genetic diversity and evolution of rhinoviruses can lead to a better understanding of viral evolution, the common cold, and more dangerous infections.


image: Athletes Are Champion Visual Learners

Athletes Are Champion Visual Learners

By | January 31, 2013

Pro athletes can learn to parse a complicated moving visual scene faster than most.


image: The Sound of Salt

The Sound of Salt

By | January 30, 2013

A putative ion channel integral to mammalian hearing turns out to be an elusive salt-sensing chemoreceptor in nematode worms.


image: Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

By | January 28, 2013

From cardiovascular problems to neurological disorders, a plethora of new medical devices are reducing the need for surgery and improving the quality and safety of healthcare.


image: Neurologist Faked Stroke Data

Neurologist Faked Stroke Data

By | January 28, 2013

A University of Wisconsin neuroscientist is found guilty of falsifying Western blots as part of his stroke research, and has requested the retraction of two papers.

1 Comment

image: The Making of a Bully

The Making of a Bully

By | January 25, 2013

Adolescent rats exposed to stress grow into pathologically aggressive adults, behaviors that may be explained by accompanying epigenetic changes and altered brain activity.


image: Stem Cells Not Rejected

Stem Cells Not Rejected

By | January 25, 2013

Researchers uncover more evidence that reprogrammed stem cells are not attacked by the immune system, suggesting they may one day serve as effective therapies.

1 Comment

image: Non-coding Mutations May Drive Cancer

Non-coding Mutations May Drive Cancer

By | January 24, 2013

The majority of human melanomas contain mutations in a gene promoter, suggesting mutations in regulatory regions may spur some cancers.



Popular Now

  1. Birth of the Skin Microbiome
    Daily News Birth of the Skin Microbiome

    The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

  2. Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet
  3. Battling the Bulge
    Bio Business Battling the Bulge

    Weight-loss drugs that target newly characterized obesity-related receptors and pathways could finally offer truly effective fat control.

  4. How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings
Life Technologies