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image: Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

By | November 27, 2012

Autism researchers are testing the ability of whipworm eggs to treat autism in a new clinical trial.

10 Comments

image: Opinion: Talking Genomics

Opinion: Talking Genomics

By | November 13, 2012

The crucial importance of language in the debate over the regulation of direct-to-consumer genetic tests

1 Comment

image: Inflammation for Regeneration

Inflammation for Regeneration

By | November 8, 2012

Inflammatory signals in injured zebrafish brains promote the growth of new neurons.

1 Comment

image: Sandy’s Impact on Science

Sandy’s Impact on Science

By | November 5, 2012

More stories surface about how last week’s super storm is affecting research up and down the coast—and how science is fighting back.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

By | November 1, 2012

In Chapter 2, "Consequences and Evolution: The Cause That Works Backwards," author Susan M. Schneider places evolutionary theory in terms of the science of consequences.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2012

Spillover, Answers for Aristotle, Who’s in Charge? and Science Set Free

1 Comment

image: Creative Emulsification

Creative Emulsification

By | November 1, 2012

Enhancing data collection from emulsion PCR reactions: three case studies

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image: Military Mind Wars

Military Mind Wars

By | November 1, 2012

How neuroscience research can inform military counterintelligence tactics, and the moral responsibilities that accompany such research

5 Comments

image: PCR Usage and Preferences

PCR Usage and Preferences

By | November 1, 2012

Quantitative real-time technology dominates the market today but digital PCR is on the rise.

0 Comments

image: Poetry and Pictures, circa 1830

Poetry and Pictures, circa 1830

By | November 1, 2012

On the bicentennial of his birth, Edward Lear is celebrated for his whimsical poetry and his stunningly accurate scientific illustrations.

1 Comment

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