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» digital PCR, culture and developmental biology

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image: Art Through the Nose

Art Through the Nose

By | November 29, 2012

A new show at New York’s Museum of Art and Design celebrates olfaction and the science behind modern perfume making.

3 Comments

image: Opinion: Talking Genomics

Opinion: Talking Genomics

By | November 13, 2012

The crucial importance of language in the debate over the regulation of direct-to-consumer genetic tests

1 Comment

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Sandy’s Impact on Science

By | November 5, 2012

More stories surface about how last week’s super storm is affecting research up and down the coast—and how science is fighting back.

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image: Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

By | November 1, 2012

In Chapter 2, "Consequences and Evolution: The Cause That Works Backwards," author Susan M. Schneider places evolutionary theory in terms of the science of consequences.

1 Comment

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Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2012

Spillover, Answers for Aristotle, Who’s in Charge? and Science Set Free

1 Comment

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Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

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Contributors

By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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Creative Emulsification

By | November 1, 2012

Enhancing data collection from emulsion PCR reactions: three case studies

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Military Mind Wars

By | November 1, 2012

How neuroscience research can inform military counterintelligence tactics, and the moral responsibilities that accompany such research

5 Comments

image: PCR Usage and Preferences

PCR Usage and Preferences

By | November 1, 2012

Quantitative real-time technology dominates the market today but digital PCR is on the rise.

0 Comments

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