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» digital PCR, culture and developmental biology

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image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

Contributors

December 1, 2011

Meet some of the people featured in the November/December 2011 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.

3 Comments

image: Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

By | December 1, 2011

Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42

5 Comments

image: Life Sciences Salary Survey 2011

Life Sciences Salary Survey 2011

By | December 1, 2011

US salaries are starting to recover after last year’s survey recorded the first-ever drop.

18 Comments

image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 

3 Comments

image: Science and Stanzas

Science and Stanzas

By | December 1, 2011

A poet finds artistic inspiration in her work as a scientist and new perceptions in the lines and linkages of her art.

3 Comments

image: Teen DNA Detectives

Teen DNA Detectives

By | December 1, 2011

Genomicist Mark Stoeckle and three high school students have taken do-it-yourself science to a new level. 

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image: Barcode High

Barcode High

By | December 1, 2011

The story of a group of high school students who, with the help of a Rockefeller University researcher, conducted and published studies on the biological provenance of sushi and teas from around New York City.

3 Comments

image: Flow Cytometry for the Masses

Flow Cytometry for the Masses

By | December 1, 2011

Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.

3 Comments

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