The Scientist

» digital PCR, evolution and genetics & genomics

Most Recent

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Accidental Species</em>

Book Excerpt from The Accidental Species

By | December 1, 2013

In Chapter 7, “The Way We Walk,” author Henry Gee describes the first steps taken by the ancestors of Homo sapiens.

0 Comments

image: PCR: Past, Present, & Future

PCR: Past, Present, & Future

By | December 1, 2013

Highlights from a webinar held by The Scientist to celebrate 30 years of PCR: the technique's invention, quantitative real-time PCR, and digital PCR

0 Comments

image: Standing Up for Sex

Standing Up for Sex

By | December 1, 2013

Humans evolved the ability to walk on two legs because it allowed them to more accurately size up prospective mates. Or did they?

8 Comments

image: Microbial Terroir

Microbial Terroir

By | November 26, 2013

Researchers show that microbes on the surface and stems of wine grapes are nonrandomly associated with the plant’s variety and geographic region.

0 Comments

image: FDA to 23andMe: Stop Marketing Kits

FDA to 23andMe: Stop Marketing Kits

By | November 26, 2013

The US Food and Drug Administration blocks the marketing of unapproved genetic tests.  

9 Comments

image: GM Salmon Goes Commercial

GM Salmon Goes Commercial

By | November 26, 2013

Environment Canada allows production of genetically modified salmon eggs at commercial levels.

1 Comment

image: Review: <em>The Origin of Species</em>

Review: The Origin of Species

By | November 22, 2013

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute this week released three short films to teach students about evolution and speciation.

4 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 18–22

Week in Review: November 18–22

By | November 22, 2013

Chilly mice develop more tumors; gut bacteria aid cancer treatment; two Y chromosome genes sufficient for assisted reproduction; HIV’s “invisibility cloak”

0 Comments

image: It Takes Two

It Takes Two

By | November 21, 2013

Two genes from the Y chromosome are sufficient to generate male mice capable of fathering healthy offspring via an assisted reproductive technique.

1 Comment

image: Trouble for Darwin’s Frogs

Trouble for Darwin’s Frogs

By | November 21, 2013

Chytrid fungus has likely driven the decline of two South American frog species named for Charles Darwin.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  2. RNAi’s Future in Drug-Target Screening
    News Analysis RNAi’s Future in Drug-Target Screening

    A recent CRISPR study contradicted years of RNA interference research on a well-studied cancer drug target. But is it the last nail in the coffin for RNAi as a screening tool? 

  3. A History of Screening for Natural Products to Fight Cancer
  4. Streakers, Poopers, and Performers: The Wilder Side of Wildlife Cameras
AAAS