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image: Week in Review: December 2–6

Week in Review: December 2–6

By | December 6, 2013

Oldest hominin DNA sequence; visualizing dyslexia; testing CRISPR; cancer and autoimmunity

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image: An Open Invitation

An Open Invitation

By | December 1, 2013

On creating communal, equitable discourse to broaden participation in genetics research

3 Comments

image: Biology's Coefficient

Biology's Coefficient

By | December 1, 2013

Joel Cohen uses the tools of mathematics to deconstruct questions of life.

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image: PCR: Past, Present, & Future

PCR: Past, Present, & Future

By | December 1, 2013

Highlights from a webinar held by The Scientist to celebrate 30 years of PCR: the technique's invention, quantitative real-time PCR, and digital PCR

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image: Waiting in the Wings

Waiting in the Wings

By | December 1, 2013

A century’s worth of collected butterflies shed light on how climate change threatens the survival of early-emerging species.

1 Comment

image: Microbial Terroir

Microbial Terroir

By | November 26, 2013

Researchers show that microbes on the surface and stems of wine grapes are nonrandomly associated with the plant’s variety and geographic region.

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image: FDA to 23andMe: Stop Marketing Kits

FDA to 23andMe: Stop Marketing Kits

By | November 26, 2013

The US Food and Drug Administration blocks the marketing of unapproved genetic tests.  

9 Comments

image: Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

By | November 26, 2013

The state assembles a task force to try to slow the growth of burgeoning populations of the ecologically destructive invasive species.

2 Comments

image: GM Salmon Goes Commercial

GM Salmon Goes Commercial

By | November 26, 2013

Environment Canada allows production of genetically modified salmon eggs at commercial levels.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review: November 18–22

Week in Review: November 18–22

By | November 22, 2013

Chilly mice develop more tumors; gut bacteria aid cancer treatment; two Y chromosome genes sufficient for assisted reproduction; HIV’s “invisibility cloak”

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