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image: Ancient Microbe Migration

Ancient Microbe Migration

By | January 11, 2016

Bacteria from the stomach contents of “Iceman,” an ancient corpse frozen in a European glacier, shed light on early human migration.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | January 8, 2016

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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All Together Now

By | January 1, 2016

Understanding the biological roots of cooperation might help resolve some of the biggest scientific challenges we face.

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Contributors

By | January 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Inventing Teamwork

Inventing Teamwork

By | January 1, 2016

What can social networks among hunter-gatherers in Tanzania teach us about how cooperation evolved in human populations?

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image: To Retain a Brain

To Retain a Brain

By | January 1, 2016

Exceptional neural fossil preservation helps answer questions about ancient arthropod evolution.

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image: Maintaining Cooperation

Maintaining Cooperation

By | January 1, 2016

How organisms keep their biological partners from cheating

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image: Ancient Irish

Ancient Irish

By | December 30, 2015

The genomes of a 5,200-year-old woman and three 4,000-year-old men yield clues about the founding of Celtic populations.

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image: E.U. Revises Law on Data Sharing

E.U. Revises Law on Data Sharing

By | December 22, 2015

The newly amended legislation frees up health data, reversing an earlier provision that made it difficult for broad use of such information in research, registries, and biobanks.

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image: Dog Origins Disputed

Dog Origins Disputed

By | December 17, 2015

A genomic study suggests that dogs diverged from wolves in Southeast Asia 33,000 years ago, contrary to reports placing their origins elsewhere on the continent.

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