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Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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Control ALT, Delete Cancer

By , , and | April 1, 2015

Treating cancer by shutting down the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway

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In Custody

By | April 1, 2015

Expert tips for isolating and culturing cancer stem cells

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Professional Marksman

By | April 1, 2015

Charles Sawyers, who began his research career just as the genetic details of human oncogenes were emerging, codeveloped Gleevec, the quintessential targeted cancer therapy.

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Setbacks and Great Leaps

By | April 1, 2015

The tale of p53, a widely studied tumor suppressor gene, illustrates the inventiveness of researchers who turn mishaps into discoveries.

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The CAR T-Cell Race

By | April 1, 2015

Tumor-targeting T-cell therapies are generating remarkable remissions in hard-to-beat cancers—and attracting millions of dollars of investment along the way.

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image: The Challenges of Precision

The Challenges of Precision

By | April 1, 2015

Researchers face roadblocks to treating an individual patient’s cancer as a unique disease.

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To Each His Own

By | April 1, 2015

Cancer treatment becomes more and more personal.

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Two-Faced RNAs

By | April 1, 2015

The same microRNAs can have opposing roles in cancer.

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From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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