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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks. 

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image: Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

By | May 4, 2016

Contrary to the popular thought that many species are “unculturable,” the majority of bacteria known to populate the human gut can be grown in the lab, scientists show.

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image: Earth: Home to 1 Trillion Microbial Species

Earth: Home to 1 Trillion Microbial Species

By | May 4, 2016

A new analysis of microbial data estimates that the world is home to 1 trillion species—of which only 0.001 percent have been discovered.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Becoming Acculturated

Becoming Acculturated

By | May 1, 2016

Techniques for deep dives into the microbial dark matter

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image: Opinion: Share Data for All Diseases

Opinion: Share Data for All Diseases

By | April 28, 2016

Along with his recent $250 million donation to cancer research, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Sean Parker emphasized the importance of data sharing.

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image: Microbial Ice-Makers

Microbial Ice-Makers

By | April 26, 2016

How one bacterium turns water into ice at nonfreezing temperatures

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 11, 2016

Researchers create a new tree of life, largely composed of mystery bacteria.

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image: U.S. Diverting Ebola Funds to Zika Prep

U.S. Diverting Ebola Funds to Zika Prep

By | April 6, 2016

But this temporary measure won’t be enough to sufficiently prepare for potential outbreaks, according to Obama administration officials.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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