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image: Turning Back the Brain’s Clock

Turning Back the Brain’s Clock

By | October 15, 2014

The brain’s ability to make new neural connections can be restored in mice by blocking a protein that normally acts as a natural brake on neuroplasticity. 

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image: US Nurse Contracts Ebola

US Nurse Contracts Ebola

By | October 14, 2014

Despite wearing protective gear, a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas who helped treat the first US Ebola patient has tested positive for the virus.


image: Week in Review: October 6–10

Week in Review: October 6–10

By | October 10, 2014

Nobel Prizes awarded; transgenerational effects of mitochondrial mutations; fat-targeted gene knockdown; Ebola updates in Spain and U.S.


image: Spain and U.S. Deal with Ebola

Spain and U.S. Deal with Ebola

By | October 8, 2014

The first case of Ebola contracted outside of West Africa has the Spanish government scrambling to contain the deadly virus. In the U.S., the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the country has died.


image: Nurse Infected with Ebola in Spain

Nurse Infected with Ebola in Spain

By | October 6, 2014

The case marks the first person to contract the virus outside of West Africa.


The man diagnosed with Ebola in a Texas hospital was sent home when he initially sought care.


image: Nigeria Clears Ebola?

Nigeria Clears Ebola?

By | October 1, 2014

After nearly two dozen cases of the deadly disease, Africa’s most populous country appears to have stopped the virus in its tracks.

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image: An Eye for Detail

An Eye for Detail

By | October 1, 2014

Vision researcher John Dowling has spent a lifetime studying the neural architecture of the retina. He is closing his laboratory after 53 years, opting to extend these studies as a postdoc.


image: Eye Spies

Eye Spies

By | October 1, 2014

An issue highlighting advances in vision research


image: Guiding Light

Guiding Light

By | October 1, 2014

Retinal glial cells acting as optical fibers shuttle longer wavelengths of light to individual cones.


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