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image: Going Beyond the Lab

Going Beyond the Lab

By | July 1, 2014

Scientists who study the biological roots of sexual orientation should continue working with educators, policy-makers, and the public to put their data to good use.

10 Comments

image: Sex and Drugs

Sex and Drugs

By | July 1, 2014

Did 20th-century pharmaceutical and technological advances shape modern sexual behaviors?

2 Comments

image: Speaking of Sex

Speaking of Sex

By | July 1, 2014

July 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: To Study Unfettered

To Study Unfettered

By | July 1, 2014

Researching the causes of sexual orientation should be guided by scientific, not social, concerns.

5 Comments

image: Review: “What Lies Beneath”

Review: “What Lies Beneath”

By | June 23, 2014

An exhibit at the newly opened SciArt Center in New York City showcases work that explores hidden worlds.

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

1 Comment

image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Drunken Monkey</em>

Book Excerpt from The Drunken Monkey

By | June 1, 2014

In Chapter 3, "On the Inebriation of Elephants," author Robert Dudley considers whether tales of tipsy pachyderms and bombed baboons have any basis in scientific truth.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2014

Proof, Caffeinated, A Sting in the Tale, and The Insect Cookbook

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image: Drunks and Monkeys

Drunks and Monkeys

By | June 1, 2014

Understanding our primate ancestors’ relationship with alcohol can inform its use by modern humans.  

5 Comments

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