The Scientist

» ebola, immunology and developmental biology

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

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image: Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

By | April 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Columbia University. Age: 41

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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image: Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

By | March 27, 2015

A study suggests that the virus may not be evolving as quickly as a previous group estimated.

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image: Ebola Vax Trial Update

Ebola Vax Trial Update

By | March 26, 2015

A novel Ebola vaccine being tested in China is safe and provokes a notable immune response in people, according to a Phase 1 trial.

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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: WHO: Ramp Up Vaccination

WHO: Ramp Up Vaccination

By | March 23, 2015

The World Health Organization is calling for an increase in routine vaccinations for measles and other preventable diseases in Ebola-affected countries.

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image: T Cells of the Skin

T Cells of the Skin

By | March 18, 2015

A census of adaptive immune system components in human skin reveals a variety of resident and traveling memory T cells.

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image: Elevated Measles Risk in Ebola-Stricken Regions

Elevated Measles Risk in Ebola-Stricken Regions

By | March 13, 2015

Decreased vaccination rates could lead to a deadlier measles outbreak, according to a study.

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