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image: An Immunological Timeline for Pregnancy

An Immunological Timeline for Pregnancy

By | September 1, 2017

A new study uses blood samples from pregnant women to track changes in the immune system leading up to birth, and predicts gestational age from the mothers’ immune signatures.

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image: How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

By | September 1, 2017

A study traces proteins’ evolution from the immune to the olfactory system.

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image: Kate Rubins Was the First to Sequence DNA in Space

Kate Rubins Was the First to Sequence DNA in Space

By | September 1, 2017

The virologist turned NASA astronaut pioneered DNA sequencing in space and conducted experiments in microgravity.

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image: Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

By | September 1, 2017

The once fringe idea is gaining traction among the scientific community.

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Emerging evidence links bacterial or viral infection with the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Dengue Infection Impairs Immune Defense Against Zika

Dengue Infection Impairs Immune Defense Against Zika

By | August 18, 2017

A memory B cell response to Zika virus in dengue-infected patients produced antibodies that were poorly neutralizing in vitro and instead enhanced infection.

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image: The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

By | August 7, 2017

Researchers continue to identify new T-cell subtypes—and devise ways to use them to fight cancer. The Scientist attempts to catalog them all.

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Another case of HIV remission emerges, this time in a South African girl diagnosed as an infant and disease-free for more than eight years.

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image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

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image: Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

By | July 17, 2017

In tissue samples from rhesus macaques, researchers find the virus in the same immune-privileged sites where Ebola has been found to persist in humans.

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