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» ebola, immunology and developmental biology

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image: Interferon Discoverer Dies

Interferon Discoverer Dies

By | January 26, 2015

Jean Lindemann, the virologist who helped figure out that interferons were responsible for anti-viral responses, has passed away at age 90.

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image: Inflammation Overdrive

Inflammation Overdrive

By | January 15, 2015

Experimental vaccines that specifically boost T helper cells lead to immunopathology and death in mice.

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image: Ebola Update

Ebola Update

By | January 12, 2015

Researchers gear up for efficacy trials of experimental Ebola vaccines in Africa.

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image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.

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image: Guinea Pigs to Model Ebola Spread

Guinea Pigs to Model Ebola Spread

By | January 5, 2015

A new guinea pig model of Ebola viral transmission shows that direct contact with infected animals is not necessary to catch the disease.

1 Comment

image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

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image: Funding Research in Africa

Funding Research in Africa

By | January 1, 2015

The ongoing Ebola epidemic in West Africa is drawing more money to study the virus, but what about funding for African science in general?

2 Comments

image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

6 Comments

image: Bats the Source of Ebola?

Bats the Source of Ebola?

By | December 30, 2014

The epidemic in West Africa may have been sparked by bats in Guinea, researchers propose, but concrete evidence of the route of zoonotic infection is lacking.

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