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image: Ebola’s Cellular Key

Ebola’s Cellular Key

By | May 27, 2015

Scientists studying the basic molecular steps of Ebola infection identify a mammalian protein that is essential for the pathogen to infect mice.

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Liberia Declared Free of Ebola

Liberia Declared Free of Ebola

By | May 12, 2015

After the West African nation goes more than a month with no new reported cases of viral infection, the World Health Organization says the country is Ebola-free.

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image: Measles Vax’s Off-Target Effects

Measles Vax’s Off-Target Effects

By | May 11, 2015

Researchers find evidence that measles vaccines reduced deaths from other infectious diseases due to “immune amnesia.”

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image: Long-Lived Virus

Long-Lived Virus

By | May 8, 2015

New research suggests Ebola can survive on surfaces for days and can be transmitted via semen.

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image: Outsmarting HIV

Outsmarting HIV

By | May 4, 2015

Small molecules that mimic the T-cell surface receptor CD4 could expose the virus to antibody-based immune responses.

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image: Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

By | May 1, 2015

Principal Investigator, Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard. Age: 33

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image: Llamas as Lab Rats

Llamas as Lab Rats

By | May 1, 2015

From diagnostics to vaccines, llama antibodies point to new directions in HIV research.

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image: Looking for Latent HIV

Looking for Latent HIV

By | May 1, 2015

Sequencing HIV integration sites suggests that clonally expanded T-cell populations may not be the main source of latent virus.

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image: Soluble Signal

Soluble Signal

By | May 1, 2015

An immune protein previously thought to mark inactive T cells has a free-floating form that correlates with HIV disease progression.

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