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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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image: U.S. Diverting Ebola Funds to Zika Prep

U.S. Diverting Ebola Funds to Zika Prep

By | April 6, 2016

But this temporary measure won’t be enough to sufficiently prepare for potential outbreaks, according to Obama administration officials.

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image: One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

By | April 5, 2016

Certain immune cells surrounding the organ appear to block viral entry.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Tumor Traps

Tumor Traps

By | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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image: WHO: Ebola Emergency Over

WHO: Ebola Emergency Over

By | March 30, 2016

While additional flare-ups may occur, the World Health Organization says countries now “have the capacity to respond rapidly to new virus emergences.”

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image: WHO: Ebola Confirmed in Guinea

WHO: Ebola Confirmed in Guinea

By | March 21, 2016

After declaring the end of an Ebola flare-up in Sierra Leone, the World Health Organization confirms two cases in Guinea. 

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image: More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

By | March 8, 2016

A second study finds evidence that feeding children peanuts could help prevent them from developing allergies to the legume later in life.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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