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image: Falling Out of the Family Tree

Falling Out of the Family Tree

By | March 1, 2015

A mutation in an ethanol-metabolizing enzyme arose around the time that arboreal primates shifted to a more terrestrial lifestyle, perhaps as an adaptation to eating fermented fruit.

1 Comment

image: Evolutionary Rewiring

Evolutionary Rewiring

By | February 26, 2015

Strong selective pressure can lead to rapid and reproducible evolution in bacteria.

7 Comments

image: Fighting Allergy with Allergen

Fighting Allergy with Allergen

By | February 25, 2015

Babies who ate peanuts were less likely to develop an allergy to the food by the time they hit kindergarten, according to a new study.

4 Comments

image: Rapid Ebola Test Approved

Rapid Ebola Test Approved

By | February 24, 2015

The World Health Organization OKs the first 15-minute Ebola diagnostic test.

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image: Marine Life Trending Larger

Marine Life Trending Larger

By | February 23, 2015

Ocean animals have been getting bigger over the millennia, according to an analysis of thousands of genera that have plied Earth’s seas since the Cambrian Period.

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image: Two New Jurassic Mammals Found

Two New Jurassic Mammals Found

By | February 13, 2015

Researchers working in China have unearthed the fossil remains of two diminutive mammals that speak volumes about faunal diversity during the Jurassic Period.

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image: Ebola Victims Still Infectious a Week After Death

Ebola Victims Still Infectious a Week After Death

By | February 12, 2015

Ebola virus can remain infectious for up to seven days on the bodies of monkeys that died from the disease, researchers show.

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image: Finch Findings

Finch Findings

By | February 12, 2015

Full genomes of Darwin’s Galápagos finches reveal a critical gene for beak shape and three overlooked species.

1 Comment

image: Trapped in Time

Trapped in Time

By | February 10, 2015

Ancient sulfur-eating deep-sea bacteria closely resemble modern variants, suggesting evolution may not occur in static environments.

1 Comment

image: Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

By | February 4, 2015

Genetically modified T memory stem cells persist in patients for more than 10 years, and can differentiate into a variety of T cell types.

1 Comment

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