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image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.

2 Comments

image: Guinea Pigs to Model Ebola Spread

Guinea Pigs to Model Ebola Spread

By | January 5, 2015

A new guinea pig model of Ebola viral transmission shows that direct contact with infected animals is not necessary to catch the disease.

1 Comment

image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

4 Comments

image: Funding Research in Africa

Funding Research in Africa

By | January 1, 2015

The ongoing Ebola epidemic in West Africa is drawing more money to study the virus, but what about funding for African science in general?

2 Comments

image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

6 Comments

image: Bats the Source of Ebola?

Bats the Source of Ebola?

By | December 30, 2014

The epidemic in West Africa may have been sparked by bats in Guinea, researchers propose, but concrete evidence of the route of zoonotic infection is lacking.

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image: CDC Tech Exposed to Ebola?

CDC Tech Exposed to Ebola?

By | December 29, 2014

A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lab mistakenly transferred the wrong Ebola samples—ones that may have contained live virus—to another agency lab.

1 Comment

image: The Year in Pathogens

The Year in Pathogens

By | December 29, 2014

Ebola, MERS, and enterovirus D68; polio eradication efforts; new regulations on potentially dangerous research

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image: Science Setbacks: 2014

Science Setbacks: 2014

By | December 25, 2014

This year in life science was marked by paltry federal funding increases, revelations of sequence contamination, and onerous regulations.

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image: Repurposed Retroviruses

Repurposed Retroviruses

By | December 18, 2014

B cells have commandeered ancient viral sequences in the genome to transmit antigen signals.

0 Comments

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