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image: Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

By | November 5, 2015

Gut microbiome composition can influence the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy in mice.

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image: Ebola’s Immune Escape

Ebola’s Immune Escape

By | November 3, 2015

The virus can persist in several tissues where the immune system is less active. Researchers are working to better understand this phenomenon and how it can stall the clearing of Ebola in survivors.

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image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

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image: Not Immune to Fat

Not Immune to Fat

By | November 1, 2015

The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells

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image: Weak Support for Malaria Vaccine

Weak Support for Malaria Vaccine

By | October 27, 2015

The World Health Organization recommends more pilot trials.

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image: B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers identify a subset of proinflammatory cytokine-producing B cells that may spark multiple sclerosis-related inflammation.  

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image: Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers design antibody-like proteins to awaken and destroy HIV holdouts.

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image: Persistent Virus

Persistent Virus

By | October 15, 2015

Researchers detect Ebola virus fragments in semen samples from some male survivors up to nine months after the onset of symptoms.

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image: Dengue’s Downfall?

Dengue’s Downfall?

By | September 15, 2015

Researchers characterize a protein that could be key to the virus’s virulence—and to developing a vaccine against the mosquito-borne disease.

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image: Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

Immune Cells Can Deliver Deadly Packages

By | September 8, 2015

Much of the CD4+ T-cell death that occurs during HIV infection may be caused by direct delivery of the virus from neighboring cells, a study shows.

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