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In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2015

How to Clone a Mammoth, The Upright Thinkers, The Thirteenth Step, and Humankind

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image: New Immunity

New Immunity

By | June 1, 2015

A scaffolding protein forms the hub of a newly identified immune pathway in plants.

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image: Reimagining Humanity

Reimagining Humanity

By | June 1, 2015

As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.

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image: Ebola’s Cellular Key

Ebola’s Cellular Key

By | May 27, 2015

Scientists studying the basic molecular steps of Ebola infection identify a mammalian protein that is essential for the pathogen to infect mice.

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While some in the scientific and religious communities have declared an end to the tensions between faith and fact, the conflict continues to have impacts on health, politics, and the environment.

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image: Liberia Declared Free of Ebola

Liberia Declared Free of Ebola

By | May 12, 2015

After the West African nation goes more than a month with no new reported cases of viral infection, the World Health Organization says the country is Ebola-free.

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image: Measles Vax’s Off-Target Effects

Measles Vax’s Off-Target Effects

By | May 11, 2015

Researchers find evidence that measles vaccines reduced deaths from other infectious diseases due to “immune amnesia.”

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image: Long-Lived Virus

Long-Lived Virus

By | May 8, 2015

New research suggests Ebola can survive on surfaces for days and can be transmitted via semen.

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image: Outsmarting HIV

Outsmarting HIV

By | May 4, 2015

Small molecules that mimic the T-cell surface receptor CD4 could expose the virus to antibody-based immune responses.

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