The Scientist

» ebola, culture and immunology

Most Recent

image: Review: “Please Continue”

Review: “Please Continue”

By | February 11, 2014

A play that dramatizes Stanley Milgram’s infamous social psychology experiments from the 1960s captures the personal side of human research.

4 Comments

image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

0 Comments

image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.

2 Comments

image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

2 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Buddhist Biology</em>

Book Excerpt from Buddhist Biology

By | February 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “A Science Sutra,” author David Barash describes how the ancient philosophy might form the perfect link between science and religion.

11 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2014

Me, Myself, and Why, RedDevil 4, Neanderthal Man, and Science from Sight to Insight

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2014

February 2014's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: Science Cartoonist Doesn’t Draw “Funny Style”

Science Cartoonist Doesn’t Draw “Funny Style”

By | January 31, 2014

Sidney Harris communicates science with minimal line work.

1 Comment

image: Review: “Green Porno”

Review: “Green Porno”

By | January 29, 2014

Isabella Rossellini explores nature’s kinky side in a one-woman show.

0 Comments

image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Grass Routes
    Features Grass Routes

    Researchers are discovering a suite of new locations and functions of endocannabinoid receptors that play roles in sickness and in health.

  3. Studies Retracted After UCLA Investigation
  4. Trump Nominates Sam Clovis to Lead USDA Research
AAAS