The Scientist

» ebola and culture

Most Recent

image: Week in Review: November 2–6

Week in Review: November 2–6

By | November 6, 2015

How Ebola hides from immune cells; gut microbes’ role in immunotherapy response; new mechanisms of hearing loss; butterflies use milkweed toxins to ward off predators

0 Comments

image: Following the Funding

Following the Funding

By | November 4, 2015

Researchers use network theory to estimate the importance of relationships among researchers and institutions in attracting grant money.

0 Comments

image: Ebola’s Immune Escape

Ebola’s Immune Escape

By | November 3, 2015

The virus can persist in several tissues where the immune system is less active. Researchers are working to better understand this phenomenon and how it can stall the clearing of Ebola in survivors.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

0 Comments

image: 2015 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2015 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By and | November 1, 2015

This year’s survey highlights dramatic regional, sector, and gender variations.

13 Comments

image: Persistent Virus

Persistent Virus

By | October 15, 2015

Researchers detect Ebola virus fragments in semen samples from some male survivors up to nine months after the onset of symptoms.

0 Comments

image: Scientists Skip Cell Line Validation

Scientists Skip Cell Line Validation

By | October 12, 2015

Despite known problems with contamination and mislabeled cell lines, most researchers continue to operate without authenticating cells’ identity.

2 Comments

image: Debating the Value of Anonymity

Debating the Value of Anonymity

By | October 5, 2015

PubPeer responds to criticism that anonymous post-publication peer review threatens the scientific process.

1 Comment

image: Ready, Willing, and Able

Ready, Willing, and Able

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers with disabilities are making their fields more accessible.

0 Comments

image: Study: Men Get Bigger Start-Up Packages

Study: Men Get Bigger Start-Up Packages

By | September 17, 2015

A new analysis reveals yet another gender gap in science.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS