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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Image of the Day: Inner Conflicts

Image of the Day: Inner Conflicts

By | April 13, 2017

Transcriptomic analyses of a patient with severe Ebola virus disease revealed shifts in the expression of antiviral and immune response genes, corresponding to the stages of illness.

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A mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.

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Mice exposed to low doses of penicillin in utero or as young pups exhibited long-term behavioral differences not seen in their non-exposed counterparts, according to a study.

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Recolonizing middle-aged animals with bacteria from younger ones kept killifish alive longer than usual, researchers report.

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image: In Certain Social Bees, Gut Microbiomes Follow Phylogeny

In Certain Social Bees, Gut Microbiomes Follow Phylogeny

By | March 29, 2017

Corbiculate bees and their gut-dwelling microbes have been coevolving since the social species evolved from their solitary ancestors around 80 million years ago, scientists suggest. 

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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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