The Scientist

» ebola, disease/medicine and neuroscience

Most Recent

image: Filling In the Notes

Filling In the Notes

By | September 1, 2014

Why the brain produces musical hallucinations

1 Comment

image: Head Scratchers

Head Scratchers

By | September 1, 2014

Many natural phenomena elude our understanding.

5 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2014

September 2014's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: TS Live: Handy Apes

TS Live: Handy Apes

By | September 1, 2014

Studying handedness in chimps may shed light on the mysterious trait in humans.

4 Comments

image: The Second Coming of RNAi

The Second Coming of RNAi

By | September 1, 2014

Now showing clinical progress against liver diseases, the gene-silencing technique begins to fulfill some of its promises.

1 Comment

image: Ebola Outbreak Strains Sequenced

Ebola Outbreak Strains Sequenced

By | August 28, 2014

Ninety-nine publicly available genomes could help researchers working to develop diagnostics, vaccines, and therapies. 

4 Comments

image: Expanding ENCODE

Expanding ENCODE

By | August 27, 2014

Latest Encyclopedia of DNA Elements data enable researchers to compare genome regulation across species. 

1 Comment

image: Light-Activated Memory Switch

Light-Activated Memory Switch

By | August 27, 2014

Scientists use optogenetics to swap out negative memories for positive ones—and vice versa—in mice.

0 Comments

image: Ebola’s Toll on Healthcare Workers

Ebola’s Toll on Healthcare Workers

By | August 26, 2014

“Unprecedented number of medical staff infected with Ebola,” the World Health Organization says.

2 Comments

image: Social Data for Ebola Surveillance

Social Data for Ebola Surveillance

By | August 26, 2014

Algorithms that map social media posts and mobile phone data can help researchers track epidemics.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

  4. Immune Cells Deliver Cancer Drugs to the Brain
AAAS