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The antibodies bind conserved viral parts, allowing them to neutralize all five Ebola types.

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image: Two Confirmed Cases of Ebola in Congo

Two Confirmed Cases of Ebola in Congo

By | May 15, 2017

More than a dozen other individuals are suspected of infection in the central African nation.

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image: Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

By | May 3, 2017

A heat block, a truck battery, and a novel RNA amplification assay make for in-the-field surveillance of the virus.

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image: Polio Vaccine Pioneer Dies

Polio Vaccine Pioneer Dies

By | May 2, 2017

Julius Youngner collaborated with Jonas Salk on the polio vaccine, and later identified interferon gamma and contributed to an equine influenza vaccine.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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image: Image of the Day: Inner Conflicts

Image of the Day: Inner Conflicts

By | April 13, 2017

Transcriptomic analyses of a patient with severe Ebola virus disease revealed shifts in the expression of antiviral and immune response genes, corresponding to the stages of illness.

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image: Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

Viral Trigger for Celiac Disease?

By | April 6, 2017

A common, seemingly benign human virus can trigger an immune response that leads to celiac disease in a mouse model, researchers show. 

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