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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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By analyzing the genomes of 161 dog breeds, scientists discover how and when certain canine breeds emerged.

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The state’s board of education approves new standards that ease up on having students dig into scientific issues relevant to “intelligent design” arguments.

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image: Image of the Day: Inner Conflicts

Image of the Day: Inner Conflicts

By | April 13, 2017

Transcriptomic analyses of a patient with severe Ebola virus disease revealed shifts in the expression of antiviral and immune response genes, corresponding to the stages of illness.

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image: New Giant Virus Group Reported

New Giant Virus Group Reported

By | April 6, 2017

A genomic analysis of “Klosneuviruses” suggests that they evolved from small viruses that accumulated genetic material over time, but not all virologists are convinced. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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image: Location, Location, Location

Location, Location, Location

By | April 1, 2017

Since first proposing that a cell’s function and biology depend on its surroundings, Mina Bissell continues to probe the role of the extracellular matrix.

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image: Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

By | April 1, 2017

Following a spate of patient deaths in clinical trials testing modified T cells for the treatment of cancer, researchers work to reduce the treatment’s toxicity without sacrificing efficacy.

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