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image: Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

By | September 28, 2016

Researchers identify aspects of the patient, the virus, and the infection itself that influence whether a person with HIV will produce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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The National Institutes of Health is hosting a two-day conference on how the virus affects infants and children. The take-home message so far: microcephaly is but one of many potential problems for Zika-exposed fetuses.

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image: How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

By | September 21, 2016

Caffeine-producing plants use three different biochemical pathways and two different enzyme families to make the same molecule.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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Matching the immunological characteristics of donor retinal cells to those of the recipient can reduce the chance of rejection.

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image: Stingrays Chew Too

Stingrays Chew Too

By | September 15, 2016

Researchers observe stingrays moving their jaws to grind up prey, a behavior thought to be restricted to mammals.

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image: Neonatal Gut Bacteria Might Promote Asthma

Neonatal Gut Bacteria Might Promote Asthma

By | September 12, 2016

Byproducts of gut microbes in some 1-month–old babies trigger inflammation that is linked to later asthma development, researchers find.

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image: Week in Review: September 5–9

Week in Review: September 5–9

By | September 9, 2016

Environmental magnetite in the human brain; prion structure takes shape; watching E. coli evolve in real time; learning from others’ behavior 

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image: Giant Petri Dish Displays Evolution in Space and Time

Giant Petri Dish Displays Evolution in Space and Time

By | September 8, 2016

As E. coli bacteria spread over increasingly concentrated antibiotics, researchers discover novel evolutionary pathways that confer resistance.

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image: Ebola Can Persist 19 Months in Semen, Study Finds

Ebola Can Persist 19 Months in Semen, Study Finds

By | September 1, 2016

The virus can evade the immune system longer than previously thought, raising concerns of outbreaks driven by sexual transmission.

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