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image: Neanderthals’ Genetic Legacy

Neanderthals’ Genetic Legacy

By | February 11, 2016

Ancient DNA in the genomes of modern humans influences a range of physiological traits.

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image: Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

Aging Shrinks Chromosomes

By | February 5, 2016

A study on human cells reveals how cellular aging affects the 3-D architecture of chromosomes.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Marriages of Opportunity

Marriages of Opportunity

By | February 1, 2016

New ideas for antibody-drug conjugate design

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

10 Comments

image: Schizophrenia and the Synapse

Schizophrenia and the Synapse

By | January 27, 2016

Genetic evidence suggests that overactive synaptic pruning drives development of schizophrenia.

5 Comments

image: Cross-Reactive Ebola Antibodies

Cross-Reactive Ebola Antibodies

By | January 21, 2016

Human monoclonal antibodies induced during Ebola infection are able to neutralize related viral species, scientists show. 

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image: Planning for the Next Ebola Outbreak

Planning for the Next Ebola Outbreak

By | January 20, 2016

A public-health nonprofit and an international drugmaker team up to stockpile hundreds of thousands of doses of a promising vaccine and to speed along the approval process.

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image: WHO: Ebola Transmissions End in West Africa

WHO: Ebola Transmissions End in West Africa

By | January 14, 2016

Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone have reported no cases for at least 42 days, the World Health Organization announces.

1 Comment

image: Trialed Ebola Treatment Ineffective

Trialed Ebola Treatment Ineffective

By | January 8, 2016

Field tests fail to show improved prognosis for Ebola-infected patients treated with survivors’ blood plasma.

1 Comment

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