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image: Image of the Day: Saltwater Survivors

Image of the Day: Saltwater Survivors

By | January 9, 2017

When road deicing salt enters freshwater ecosystems, prey species such as Daphnia pulex can rapidly evolve tolerance to the contaminant, buffering their local food webs from the impacts of salination.

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Neuroimaging study confirms the fusiform gyrus continues to develop throughout childhood.

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A case study reports evidence of viral replication lingering in the respiratory tract of an infected person, even after the person’s blood was Ebola free.

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image: How Hummingbirds Sense Movement While Hovering

How Hummingbirds Sense Movement While Hovering

By | January 5, 2017

A visual motion-sensing brain region found in all four-limbed vertebrates displays unique properties in Anna’s hummingbirds.

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The small lizards adapted to unique niches among dozens of isles.

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image: Historical Hunts

Historical Hunts

By | January 1, 2017

See images from a century of fur trapping and hunting in the Amazon basin.

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image: Jeremy Day Probes Reward Signaling in the Brain

Jeremy Day Probes Reward Signaling in the Brain

By | January 1, 2017

The University of Alabama, Birmingham, researcher seeks the neural roots of animal behavior

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Researchers use a century of trade records to uncover differences in the resilience of terrestrial and aquatic species.

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image: Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

Cheetah Range Drops 90 Percent

By | December 27, 2016

Estimating only 7,100 individuals remaining, researchers urge a reclassification of the species from vulnerable to endangered.

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image: Ebola Vaccine Success

Ebola Vaccine Success

By | December 23, 2016

World Health Organization confirms further development of the first Ebola vaccine.

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