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image: Funds To Speed Ebola Drug Development

Funds To Speed Ebola Drug Development

By | September 4, 2014

A $42 million US government contract awarded to an experimental Ebola medicine maker aims to accelerate the process of meeting demand for the therapeutic.

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image: NIH To Speed Ebola Vax Trials

NIH To Speed Ebola Vax Trials

By | September 2, 2014

The ongoing Ebola outbreak has prompted the National Institutes of Health to accelerate human trials of multiple Ebola vaccines, starting this week.

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image: Experimental Ebola Drug Shows Promise

Experimental Ebola Drug Shows Promise

By | September 2, 2014

ZMapp effectively rescued macaques from Ebola in a small trial, but it could be several months before supplies of the drug meet the growing human demand for it.

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image: Head Scratchers

Head Scratchers

By | September 1, 2014

Many natural phenomena elude our understanding.

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2014

September 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

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image: Splitting Hairs

Splitting Hairs

By | September 1, 2014

Fragments of mitochondrial DNA from deer hair found on the clothing of an ice-entombed mummy offer a glimpse into Copper Age ecology.

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image: Beyond the Blueprint

Beyond the Blueprint

By , , and | September 1, 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

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