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image: Facing Down Emerging Viruses

Facing Down Emerging Viruses

By | February 1, 2015

A better knowledge of the pathogenesis of emerging zoonotic diseases is crucial if we want to prepare for “the next Ebola.”

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: How Transposons Shaped Pregnancy

How Transposons Shaped Pregnancy

By | January 29, 2015

A mass migration of mobile regulatory elements increased the expression of thousands of genes in the uterus during the evolution of pregnancy.

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image: Brain Cells Behind Overeating

Brain Cells Behind Overeating

By | January 29, 2015

Scientists have defined mouse neurons responsible for excessive food consumption at an unprecedented level of detail. 

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image: America’s First Pooches

America’s First Pooches

By | January 27, 2015

Study of ancient dog DNA sheds light on early Americans’ relationships with their pets.

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image: Filming the Nematode Brain

Filming the Nematode Brain

By | January 26, 2015

Researchers record the first whole-brain videos of an unrestrained animal, viewing neural activity as a roundworm moved freely around a Petri dish.

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image: Ebola Epidemic on the Wane?

Ebola Epidemic on the Wane?

By | January 26, 2015

The number of reported cases is dropping in West Africa, World Health Organization officials report.

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image: Ebola Update

Ebola Update

By | January 26, 2015

Vaccine trial to start in Liberia as early as next week; trial for experimental therapy also planned, but production is still limited

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image: Oxytocin for Autism?

Oxytocin for Autism?

By | January 21, 2015

Scientists find that the hormone improves sociability in a mouse model of autism.

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image: Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

Fraction of SNPs Can Affect Fitness

By | January 21, 2015

A point mutation analysis of the entire human genome finds that alterations to as many as 7.5 percent of nucleotides may have contributed to humans’ evolutionary split from chimpanzees.

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