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image: Ebola Vaccines Protect Monkeys

Ebola Vaccines Protect Monkeys

By | April 9, 2015

Two new Ebola vaccine candidates prove safe and effective against the virus in macaques, a study shows.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | April 8, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Studying Ebola Survivors

Studying Ebola Survivors

By | April 6, 2015

A scientist jumps at the chance to study the blood of four Ebola survivors to better understand how the immune system responds to the deadly virus. 

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image: Study: Ebola Predictions Overstated

Study: Ebola Predictions Overstated

By | April 2, 2015

Most forecasting methods used to predict the extent of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa overestimated the epidemic’s reach, an updated analysis shows.

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image: Cancer Immunotherapist

Cancer Immunotherapist

By | April 1, 2015

Scientist to Watch Yvonne Saenger explains recent advances in using biomarkers to identify cancer patients who might benefit most from immunotherapy.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2015

Junk DNA, Cuckoo, Sapiens, and Cool

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image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

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image: Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

By | April 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Columbia University. Age: 41

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image: Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

By | March 27, 2015

A study suggests that the virus may not be evolving as quickly as a previous group estimated.

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image: Ebola Vax Trial Update

Ebola Vax Trial Update

By | March 26, 2015

A novel Ebola vaccine being tested in China is safe and provokes a notable immune response in people, according to a Phase 1 trial.

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