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» ebola, evolution and developmental biology

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2015

Junk DNA, Cuckoo, Sapiens, and Cool

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

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image: Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

By | March 27, 2015

A study suggests that the virus may not be evolving as quickly as a previous group estimated.

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image: Ebola Vax Trial Update

Ebola Vax Trial Update

By | March 26, 2015

A novel Ebola vaccine being tested in China is safe and provokes a notable immune response in people, according to a Phase 1 trial.

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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: WHO: Ramp Up Vaccination

WHO: Ramp Up Vaccination

By | March 23, 2015

The World Health Organization is calling for an increase in routine vaccinations for measles and other preventable diseases in Ebola-affected countries.

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image: Elevated Measles Risk in Ebola-Stricken Regions

Elevated Measles Risk in Ebola-Stricken Regions

By | March 13, 2015

Decreased vaccination rates could lead to a deadlier measles outbreak, according to a study.

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image: Oldest <em>Homo</em> Remains Yet Found

Oldest Homo Remains Yet Found

By | March 4, 2015

A newly discovered 2.8 million-year-old jawbone is thought to be that of a direct human ancestor.

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image: A Deathly Pallor

A Deathly Pallor

By | March 1, 2015

Global warming could lead to lighter-colored insects with waning immune defenses.

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